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Beyblade

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This article is about the manga. For the toy, see Beyblade (toy).
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Beyblade
Beyblade Logo.png
The logo of the first season of Beyblade
爆転シュート ベイブレード
(Bakuten Shūto Beiburēdo)
Genre Science fantasy, comedy-drama, sports
Manga
Written by Takao Aoki
Published by Shogakukan
English publisher Canada United States Viz Media
Demographic Children,Teens,and Adults
Magazine CoroCoro Comic
Original run 2000 – 2004
Volumes 14
Anime television series
Directed by Toshifumi Kawase
Music by Yoshihisa Hirano
Studio Madhouse
Licensed by Canada United States Nelvana Limited
Network TV Tokyo
English network Australia Network Ten, Cartoon Network
Canada YTV, Télétoon
United Kingdom Cartoon Network, Toonami

Five, POP!, S4C, Kix!
United States Jetix, Toon Disney, ABC Family

Original run January 8, 2001 – December 24, 2001
Episodes 51 (List of episodes)
Anime television series
Beyblade: VForce
Directed by Yoshio Takeuchi
Studio Nihon Animedia
Licensed by Canada United States Nelvana Limited
Network TV Tokyo
English network Australia Network Ten, Cartoon Network
United States Jetix, Toon Disney, ABC Family
Original run January 7, 2002 – December 30, 2002
Episodes 51 (List of episodes)
Anime television series
Beyblade: G-Revolution
Directed by Mitsuo Hashimoto
Studio Nihon Animedia
Licensed by Canada United States Nelvana Limited
Network TV Tokyo
English network Australia Network Ten, Cartoon Network
United States Jetix, Toon Disney, ABC Family
Original run January 6, 2003 – December 29, 2003
Episodes 52 (List of episodes)
Anime television series
Beyblade: Metal Fusion
Studio Tatsunoko Productions, Synergy SP, Nelvana
Licensed by Canada United States Nelvana Limited
Network TV Tokyo
English network Australia Network Ten, Eleven, Cartoon Network
Canada YTV
United States Cartoon Network
United Kingdom Nicktoons
Original run April 5, 2009 – March 28, 2010
Episodes 51 (List of episodes)
Anime television series
Beyblade: Metal Masters
Studio Tatsunoko Productions, Synergy SP, Nelvana
Licensed by Canada United States Nelvana Limited
Network TV Tokyo
English network Australia Network Ten, Eleven, Cartoon Network
Canada YTV
United States Cartoon Network
United Kingdom Nicktoons
Original run April 4, 2010 – March 27, 2011
Episodes 51 (List of episodes)
Anime television series
Beyblade: Metal Fury
Studio Tatsunoko Productions, Synergy SP, Nelvana
Licensed by Canada United States Nelvana Limited
Network TV Tokyo
English network Australia Network Ten, Eleven, Cartoon Network
Canada YTV
United States Cartoon Network
Original run April 3, 2011 – April 1, 2012
Episodes 52 (Japan) 39 (international) (List of episodes)
Anime television series
Beyblade: Shogun Steel
Directed by Kunihisa Sugishima
Written by Katsumi Hasegawa
Studio Synergy SP, Nelvana
Network TV Tokyo
English network Canada YTV
United States Cartoon Network
United Kingdom Nickelodeon
Original run April 8, 2012 – ongoing
Episodes 52 (Japan) 26 (international) (List of episodes)
Anime television series
BeyWheelz (Powered by Beyblade)
Studio Nelvana
Network Cartoon Network
Original run August 11, 2012 – ongoing
Episodes 26 (13 aired)
(List of episodes)
Anime and Manga Portal

Beyblade (爆転シュート ベイブレード Bakuten Shūto Beiburēdo?, lit. “Explosive Shoot Beyblade”) is a Japanese manga series written and illustrated by Takao Aoki. Originally serialized in CoroCoro Comic from 2000 to 2002, the individual chapters were collected and published in 14 tankōbon by Shogakukan. The series focuses on a group of kids who form teams with which they battle one another using highly powerful spinning tops called “Beyblades”.

The manga is licensed for English language release in North America by Viz Media. An anime adaptation, also titled Beyblade and spanning 51 episodes, aired in Japan on TV Tokyo from January 8, 2001 to December 24, 2001. The second, Beyblade V-Force, ran for another 51 episodes from January 7, 2002 until December 30, 2002. Beyblade G Revolution, the third and final adaptation, also spanned 51 episodes (the 51st was a double-length special but was split into two episodes for the Western release) and aired from January 6, 2003, until its conclusion on December 29, 2003. Nelvana licensed the anime for an English-language release. Takara Tomy also developed the Beyblade toy line.

Contents

Plot

Beyblade

A young boy named Tyson Granger (Takao Kinomiya) enters the Japan Regional BeyBlade Qualifying Tournament. Tyson encounters Ray Kon (Rei Kon) and Kai Hiwatari, and after defeating them, they organize a team, known as the Bladebreakers, along with Max Tate (Max Mizuhara). The Bladebreakers tour China to register for the championships, while confronting the White Tigers, Ray’s former team. It is seen that Ray’s old team holds a grudge against him for leaving them, but towards the end of the Chinese Tournament, Ray and his ex-teammates make amends, and the Bladebreakers win the tournament. After this, Tyson and his friends arrive in the United States to fight the All Starz, who are coached by Max’s mother. After winning the American league, the team find themselves stranded in Europe. In order to get to Russia to register for the World Championships, they must battle the Majestics who are Europe’s top bladers. Once in Russia, Tyson and his friends find themselves up against the Demolition Boys, the Russian Champions, who are ruthless and obsessed with power. The Bladebreakers then discover that the Demolition Boys are merely tools for the BIOVOLT Corporation, run by Kai’s grandfather, Voltaire, and Boris, a criminal mastermind. Initially, Kai was pursued by Boris to join the Demolition Boys in the ultimate quest for power, the Black Dranzer Bit-Beast which Kai was seeking to become the best Beyblader. However, he realizes his mistakes and rejoins the Bladebreakers. During the finals, Kai loses the first round and his Dranzer to Spencer and his bit-beast Seaborg. Ray barely manages to win against Bryan, but has to be taken to hospital after the injuries from the match. Tyson manages to defeat Tala, the Demolition Boys whose body had been modified by Boris to win the match, in the final round and manages to win the title of the BBA world champion.

Beyblade: V-Force

The team has gone their separate ways, but Team Psykick and the Saint Shields, attack the Blade-breakers by trying to steal their bit-beasts for their own reasons. Hilary Tachibana (Hiromi Tachibana) joins the Blade-breakers, but takes time to learn the fact that Beyblade isn’t just a stupid game as she thinks it is. The first half of the second season ends with the Blade-breakers defeating Team Psykick, who were manipulating their friends Kane, Salima, Goki and Jimmy. The second half of season 2 deals with the truth of why the Saint Shields and Team Psykick are after their bit-beasts and about a rock that Max’s mother found that contains bit-beasts, which is stolen by Team Psykick. The Saint Shields’ reason is because they wish to seal the bit-beasts in a rock because they fear that the bit-beasts could get out of control like they did in the past. Team Psykick’s reason is because the Psykick’s leader, Dr. Zagart, wants the bit-beasts to turn his android son (an exact replica of his actual son who died in an accident) into a real human. After defeating the Saint Shields, Zeo, who is one of Tyson’s new friends, learns the truth about his past and how he was created Dr. Zagart, so he uses the rock’s strongest bit-beast, Cerberus (pronounced ker-bur-is), to get the bit-beasts. The world championships are coming to Japan, so Hilary separates the Blade-breakers into two teams: Tyson and Max for one, Kai and Ray for the other. However, during the tournament, Zeo and his partner Gordo, are destroying the competition. Soon enough, Zeo and Gordo eliminate Kai and Ray, taking Kai’s Dranzer in the process. Tyson and Max face Zeo and Gordo in the final. Tyson manages to beat Gordo, but Zeo defeats Max and captures Draciel. During the final battle between Tyson and Zeo, the Blade-breakers find out that Zeo is actually an android, and about Dr. Zagart’s reason for trying to use Zeo to get the bit-beasts. Tyson manages to convince him otherwise, and manages to defeat Zeo, making him and Max the world champions once again on action.

Beyblade: G-Revolution

Kai, Ray, Max and Tyson went their separate ways and rejoined their old teams so that they have a chance to beat each other at the World Championship. This leaves only Tyson, Hilary, and Kenny on the team, but a new character, Daichi Sumeragi, and Tyson’s brother Hiro Granger, join them. One week after the results of the World Championships, Boris, the secondary villain from the first season, says things will return to the way they were before. But he declares that all the Beyblade shops must sell beyblades and their parts to BEGA associated Beybladers only, otherwise they will not be allowed to run the shops.

Tyson and the team find some parts at Max’s father’s store, which are insufficient. Then after sometime Kenny comes with the solution, he makes new type of Beyblades, using different type of parts. But they still needed one more blader, that’s when Kai, who tried to join BEGA but lost severely to Brooklyn, rejoins the team. Daichi and Ray lose the first two matches to Ming-Ming and Crusher and Max ends the third match with Mystel in a draw. Then it was Kai’s turn to face the unbeaten Brooklyn. Kai then defeats Brooklyn in a match but loses Dranzer later. Then Tyson beats Garland. Brooklyn becomes insane due to his loss to Kai and confronts Tyson. In the ensuing match match, Tyson then defeats Brooklyn after his Beyblade Dragoon absorbs the power of all the Sacred Bit Beasts and evolves into the most powerful Beyblade on Earth.

Media

Manga

The chapters of the Beyblade manga were written and illustrated by Takao Aoki. It was serialized in CoroCoro Comic form 2000 to 2004. The manga was licensed for an English-language release by Viz Media.

Anime

A three season anime television adaptation was adapted from the series. The first season, spanning 51 episodes, was produced by Madhouse and aired in Japan on TV Tokyo from January 8, 2001 to December 24, 2001. The second season, produced by Nihon Animedia and titled Beyblade V-Force, ran for another 51 episodes from January 7, 2002 until December 30, 2002. The third season, Beyblade G Revolution was also produced by Nihon Animedia. It spanned 52 episodes and ran from January 6, 2003 until its conclusion on December 29, 2003. All three seasons are licensed for English adaptation, broadcast, and release in North America by Nelvana.

A new Beyblade anime series entitled Metal Fight Beyblade was produced by Tatsunoko and Synergy SP, and is based on the aforementioned Metal Fight Beyblade manga. It premiered on April 5, 2009.[1] Nelvana has licensed the series, which was released in North America as Beyblade: Metal Fusion.[2] It premiered on Cartoon Network in June 2010 with showings on Saturdays and Sundays.

Spin-offs

Beyblade inspired a spin-off manga, BeyWheelz.

Merchandise

Beyblade developed a cult following when the series’ popular spinning top toy was launched worldwide. Now with the released fourth season of the Metal Fight Beyblade series, Metal Fight Beyblade Zero-G, a toy line which consists of Beyblades from the anime including Samurai Ifraid W145CF, MSF Shinobi Saramanda SW145SD, MSF Pirates Orojya 145D, Thief Phoenic E230GCF, Guardian Reviser 160SB, MSF Archer Gryph C145S, Pirates Killerken A230JSB, and many more are being released in Asia.

Toys

Main article: Beyblade (toy)

From left to right. “Dragoon G” and “Dranzer G”. These are examples of the Engine Gear System series.

Originally developed and manufactured by Takara Tomy, first released in 2000. The toys include a ‘launcher’ – a device for bringing the spinning top up to speed, with either a separate or integral rip-cord. This ‘ripping’ action causes the tops to be ejected, at the end of the movement. Players eject the tops into a plastic arena, with a slightly dished base, where they subsequently strike each other. The last top still spinning wins. Beyblade is largely a game of chance,[citation needed] although some players believe a particular launch style can influence the outcome of a game.

Video games

Game Release Date Platform
Jisedai Bēgoma Battle Beyblade July 23, 1999 Game Boy Color
Beyblade Fighting Tournament August 11, 2000 Game Boy Color
Bakuten Shoot Beyblade July 27, 2001 Game Boy Color
Beyblade: Let it Rip! December 5, 2002 PlayStation
Bakuten Shoot Beyblade 2002 Ikuze! Gekitō! Chō Jiryoku Battle!! June 27, 2002 Game Boy Advance
Bakuten Shoot Beyblade 2002: Beybattle Tournament 2 August 1, 2002 PlayStation
Bakuten Shoot Beyblade 2002 Team Battle! Kiryū no Akira Daichi / Takao Hen December 6, 2002 Game Boy Advance
BeyBlade VForce: Super Tournament Battle September 23, 2003 GameCube
Beyblade VForce: Ultimate Blader Jam November 18, 2003 Game Boy Advance
Beyblade: GRevolution November 18, 2004 Game Boy Advance
Metal Fight Beyblade March 26, 2009 Nintendo DS
Metal Fight Beyblade: Gachinko Stadium November 19, 2009 Wii
Metal Fight Beyblade Portable: Chōzetsu Tensei Vulcan Horses October 21, 2010 PSP
Beyblade: Metal Fusion November 9, 2010 Nintendo DS
Beyblade: Metal Fusion – Battle Fortress November 9, 2010 Wii
Beyblade Metal Fusion: Cyber Pegasus November 11, 2010 Nintendo DS
Beyblade: Metal Masters November 15, 2011 Nintendo DS

Reception

[icon] This section requires expansion. (March 2009)

Beyblade was popular among people, especially due to its toys and accessories. It gained notoriety in school playgrounds all across Australia, North America, Latin America and the United Kingdom during the early 2000s and in Pakistan during 2004-2006 and its popularity was replaced by blazing teens. It was popular in India between 2004 – 2007,its toys were liked by many. The show was aired by Jetix and Cartoon Network in America as well as in parts of Asia, Europe, and Australia. It has had renewed popularity in the last two years.

There have been many official Beyblade tournaments held across the world, just like in the anime. At official tournaments hosted by Tomy, Sonokong, Mani, or Hasbro, their companies advertise themselves as the World Beyblade Battle Association (WBBA) instead of their company name. Similar to how the WBBA is the company that hosts Beyblade tournaments in the anime.

The show was criticized for being one long, repetitive commercial.[3][4][5]

References

External links

[hide]

Beyblade by Takao Aoki & Takafumi Adachi
Anime
Original series (Episodes)
Other
Franchise
Films
Games
Characters
 
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Ditulis oleh pada Desember 19, 2012 in Uncategorized

 

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